The book is available on Amazon – check it out here: Don't Let the Bastards Grind You Down: 50 Things Every Alcoholic & Addict in Early Recovery Should Know - By Georgia W.

georgias-book2Drawing on my own experience and that of others in recovery, this book highlights fifty things that all of us should know once we’ve decided to treat our addiction. Some of the topics included are:

The First 30 Days – What to expect and how to get through it.
Things to Avoid – Protecting your recovery and coping with stress.
Dry Drunk – How not to be one.
Relapse –Developing a prevention plan and what to do if it happens.
Spouses & Partners – How to include them and rebuild relationships.
Children – It’s never too late to be a good parent or role model.
Dating in Early Recovery – The not so good, the bad and the ugly.
Twelve Step Programs – How they work and what you should know.
Isolating – Why we do it and why we shouldn’t.
Substituting and Fixing – Things we substitute for our addiction.

Believe it or not, it doesn’t matter how you got to this point in your life – the most important part is that you did. Too many alcoholics and addicts die from this disease before they get a chance to recover. Just remember that you don’t have to do it alone. There are people who want to help, those who have been to the bottom and back and are now living a life without drugs and alcohol. All you need to have is the willingness to follow some simple suggestions that have worked for many others and can work for you too.

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Comments
  1. Great Blog, I’ve enjoyed your posts and you even wrote a book…nice job! Recovery is awesome and people need to know that using isn’t necessary and we’re all capable of being clean and happy simultaneously.

    When you have time please visit http://www.burkethejerk.com, another blog about recovery!

  2. Paul says:

    I too enjoy your insight. This life is about MOMENTS and making each one in awareness. I think you help to perpetuate that message too. Thank you. Recovery can be beautiful if you have your head up looking.

    Paul

  3. Pete says:

    I bow to your writing skills.

    And your solid understanding of the
    step work.

    Pete.

  4. Chaz says:

    Ditto…. it matters less how we got here. The fact is we are here and here is where we need to start. Great advice for the newcomer. Was when I was a newcomer for sure.

    Counselors (non-recovery background) always wanted to help me dig into my past and fix what had happened… or come to grips with it… or something like that.

    This is not wront, it is just out of sequence for most of us alcoholics and addicts.

    A big part of our problem is that we simply suck at today. Inviting an alcoholic to ruminate on the past is like…. well… it is an open invitation to live in thoughts, ideas, memories, resentments, and pain.

    I didnt find sobriety and the beginnings of recovery until I started dealing with my todays. My here and nows. First of by staying sober. Then by using my todays more productively.

    It was a long time before I could ever meaningfully start looking at past with any kind of healty, productive perspective.

    Gladly though, the day eventually came and I was able to deal with much of it and accept the rest.

    Good on you for keeping the newcomer front and centre. It is a wild place to be… but we are all there at some point.

    Ciao.

    Chaz

  5. kelly says:

    Young people come from around the world come to our community of a capacity of 215 where we celebrate recovery at beach meetings every Sunday morning at 9:30am Sober Living by the Sea in Newport Beach Ca.

  6. mike says:

    Thanks for the post.
    I had a heck of time letting my buds know that being sober is actually a great way to live life. Not that they have to do it…but it works for me…and I don’t get drunk angry and disappear on them any more.
    They certainly appreciate not having to worry about me any more

  7. Rachel Bee says:

    I’m with Pete…it’s so nice to read a recovery blog written by someone who can, well, actually WRITE!

    I’m very intrigued about this book you speak of (love the cover, too!): you might have mentioned this already, but who is the publisher? Is it some sort of independent recovery press? I have a friend who just checked himself into some fancy, holistic drug rehab and seems altogether baffled by the program. He doesn’t have internet access right now, so I couldn’t point him in the direction of your blog, but I know he’d get a kick out of the book.

    Thanks for your insight!

  8. […] This post was mentioned on Twitter by Adam Edvalson. Adam Edvalson said: Don't Let the Bastards Grind You Down « Early Recovery From … http://bit.ly/d44OhT […]

  9. Dan says:

    Hi there

    I am a newcomer in the sober world. I am 36 and only admitted two days ago that alcohol is controlling me and that I need to get sober and clean RIGHT NOW. I had my last drink some time Monday morning early hours – I cannot remember when where and what it was and I only recovered from my blackout when I was lying on the tar road full of blood with a couple of guys kicking and hitting me. I still dont know what I did to provoke them, but that does not really matter anymore.

    All that matters to me know is that I’ve finally admitted my addiction and that it is destroying my life. It’s been destroying my life for over 20 years and I want to feel how it feels to live life without a hungover!

    So, I am definitely going to check out the book and I will keep an eye out on this blog -> I already read some of the posts and I already feel better about myself! I have my first AA meeting tonight and although I am scared and nervous I know I will make it.

    Thanks for sharing your experiences and knowledge with other people in need.

    Cheers

    • Georgia W. says:

      Hi Dan,
      Thanks so much for getting in touch and congratulations on your sobriety! I’ve sent a reply to the email address on your post.
      Talk to you soon.

    • Zach Gamble says:

      Hi Dan,

      I’m right now were you were over a year ago.

      If you are still hanging in there clean ‘n sober, let me know how it is going and what you did that first couple of days, weeks, months, etc.

      Thanks.

  10. So-and-so says:

    Hi! You have a very nice recovery site, here 🙂

    I’m taking a poll and would be interested in your feedback: Is internet addiction real?

    http://stark-raving-sober.blogspot.com/2010/04/is-internet-addiction-real.html

    Would you be interested in submitting the poll for feedback from your readers?

    Also, I recently started my anonymous blog and would like to know if I can add you to my blogroll, here:

    http://stark-raving-sober.blogspot.com

    Have a blessed day,

    So-and-so

    • Georgia W. says:

      Ho So-and-so,
      I think internet addiction is as real as any addiction that we engage in to change the way we feel, just like gambling, porn and sex. I think it is apparent just by the sheer number of people who are online, people who rack up hours on the internet looking at porn or gambling or thinking that everything they feel, say or do is worthy of Twittering or sticking on Facebook for all to see. Kid’s are committing suicide over things that are being said on these sights, people are being stalked by sexual predators who are doing nothing but cruising sites to get a fix. So yes, I guess I think it’s real!

  11. OmahaDad says:

    Great blog, Georgia. Keep the nuggets coming. I’ll definitely check out your book. Seven days since admitting to myself that I am an alcoholic, I’m cautiously optimistic that I’ve had my last drink and am taking the steps to develop a sober lifestyle (professional therapy, treatment, AA). I’m fortunate to have a lot of people supporting me in my journey into sobriety, but have learned the hard way that many of my friends now view me with suspicion. Ironic that recognizing my addiction, which I found to be liberating, seems to cause many of my acquaintances to trust me less than when I was simply a “drunk”.

    • Georgia W. says:

      Congratulations on making the leap from drunk to recovering drunk! Don’t worry about suspicious friends, they will come around to the idea that you mean business as you stay sober. Maybe some of your suspicious acquaintances are drinking buddies by chance?

  12. OmahaDad says:

    How’d you guess? 🙂 Although, to be fair, recently I’ve done most of my drinking secretly in the garage, and many of my “drinking buddies” probably wrote me off as a lost cause several months ago. I was probably also not nearly as much fun to hang out with as I thought I was.

    Thank God that I have people who care about me and stuck with me. When I feel the urge to drink, I repeat the line from The Big Book, “For us, to drink is to die.” Knowing how much I have to live for helps give me strength to push the voice in my head back into submission, at least for a time.

    I ordered your book from Amazon, btw. I’m really enjoying reading it, and am finding many of your experiences and insights very helpful.

    I mentioned to my counselor in recovery therapy that I seem to find the things to encourage me to remain sober just when I need them most. She told me those are called “God’s Wings”. I consider this blog and your book among my God’s Wings. Thank you.

  13. Lauren L says:

    This is a great website! Please add me to the list! Great stuff you have on here. Come visit me at:

    http://www.rainbowrecoveryclub.org/author/laurenl

    I can’t wait to read more from you!

  14. Heather says:

    I love it! Buying it in the morning!

  15. Hey, been reading your blog for a few weeks now. Love it! Keep it up, I like where you have taken it, and that book sounds awesome! So many good books to read, so little time!

  16. jbwritergirl says:

    Always great to hear that recovery is working.

  17. tommy says:

    this is an awesome site! some strong sobriety i see and great wisdoms. please check out my girlfriends site undertheinfluenceofgrace.com please show some love and check it out its a great site with a ton of heart!

  18. Jeff says:

    Nice share on your blog. My name is Jeff and I am an alcoholic and an addict. Today is AGAIN my day one in sobriety. I have been going to AA since last October, but really have not been able to maintain any sobriety beyond two weeks. But I will not give up. And as I was greatful to the recycle man for being late the other day, i dug my big book out of the paper recycle. It was bearied in the bottom from a drunken runner a few days ago. It was hard to watch all the 9-11 stuff this weekend. Ten years ago I thought 9-11-01 was going to be my day one then too….. jrromy@yahoo.com

    • Georgia W. says:

      Hi Jeff,
      Thanks for reading and posting a comment and well done. I hope you are hanging in there, the beginning is rough, especially if we have been back at the beginning many times. I have a fridge magnet that quotes Winston Churchill and it says “Never Never Never Never Give Up” its been on my fridge since early sobriety and I still look at it every day and think about how it helped me every morning when I needed it. It takes some of us longer than others to ‘get this,’ I was one of those people who tried over and over, and I’m grateful that I didn’t die while I was still trying to figure it out because sadly a lot of people do. I don’t want to be a downer but this is the truth.Keep working at your recovery Jeff, don’t give up and and good luck to you.

  19. Jeff says:

    In a meeting about a year ago a guy raises his hand and says he will be a sponsor. After the meeting I ask him as he appears to have something that I want. 1. stable sobriety, 2. he is happy in this sobriety. So he gives me his phone number and I start calling him. A year later, and many many relapses later he still has not told me how to work these steps. He never asks anything of me and only listens. I have to believe that this is not what sponsorship is and although he still appears to have what I want i am wondering if he is ever going to share it. Am I wrong to be annoyed? I feel like he does not see me as a worth while prospect.

    Jeff from Wisconsin

    • Georgia W. says:

      Hi Jeff,
      You are a person, not a prospect! I was told if I could stay sober for 30 days I could start on the steps. I needed time for my head to clear because each time I drank again, the more my head was full of the “chatter” of my disease, telling me the world had done me wrong and things like maybe I wasn’t a good enough prospect… 🙂 I can’t comment on what your sponsor is doing, but it is possible he does not think you are done yet, however, he is still taking the time to be a friend to you and listen until hopefully the time comes when you are done. If it were me I would stay sober for 30 days – in that time go to meetings, read the book, talk with others who have long term sobriety – and then ask your ‘friend’ to start being your sponsor and take you through the steps, if he won’t do it then, find someone who will.
      Best of luck to you,
      -Georgia

  20. SALLY WLSON says:

    I WAS S0BER FOR 12 YEARS. BEST 12 YRS OF MY LIFE. GOT MARRIED, HAD CHILDREN, BUILT A CAREER AND SLIPPED. I GOT AWAY FROM THE PROGRAM AND OTHER SOBER PEOPLE AND SLIPPED. I HAVE PUT ONE YEAR, THEN 9 MONTHS, THAN 10 DAYS, 3 MONTHS, ETC. I AM TRYING AGAIN. I CANT TAKE BACK THE MISTAKES I MADE DURING THAT TIME — MAINLY HURT MYSELF. BUT, I CAN PUT ONE FOOT IN FRONT OF EACH OTHER AND MOVE ON WITH IT. THIS TIME WITH ANTABUSE — IT IS SO HELPFUL. I KNOW THAT I CANNOT DRINK W/OUT ENDING UP IN A HOSPITAL AND IT ALSO HELPS WITHE THE CRAVINGS. I AM STARTING TO GET MY LIFE ON TRACK. I AM NOT A YOUNG WOMAN..AND HAVE A FAMILY AND FULL TIME JOB TO DEAL WITH. I REALLY, REALLY WANT TO STAY SOBER AND WILL MAKE MYSELF ADD AT LEAST ONE AA MTG A WEEK TO MY SCHEDULE. IT IS A START. JUST NEED TO MAKE IT STICK. IT FEELS SO AMAZING.

  21. Eddie says:

    Thanks! The information that you are providing is very valuable and should assist any alcoholic or addict while in recovery. The topics are real life situations that any recovering person is bound to encounter while getting clean and sober. Thank you for sharing the info! I got sober with the help of a sober living called New Life House. I learned a lot of the same principles that you seem to be talking about on the blog and in your book. If someone is looking for help check out the New Life House website… http://www.newlifehouse.com

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